Christmas Fireworks Traditions In North & South America

When you think of Christmas, what comes to mind? Presents, trees, lights, cookies? Those are all certainly parts of the holiday, but in many locations around the world, there's another element of the celebration that might surprise you - fireworks. Numerous parts of the world celebrate the season by shooting off fireworks, including many fireworks displays that would make the 4th of July celebrations in America proud.   It's largely South American countries that really embrace fireworks as part of their Christmas traditions, and these can involve something as small as tiny firecrackers, the large fountains of light, roman candles, and more. And of course, some countries go all-out with their fireworks displays as well. Here are some of the examples of how countries celebrate the season with things that go 'bang'.  
  • Peru - Peru is much like other parts of South America, with streets filled with people using firecrackers and a large fireworks display over major cities such as Lima.
 
  • El Salvador - This part of Central America embraces fireworks like few others. The country also enjoys meals and heads to holiday mass, all while the sound of fireworks fills the air. However, over the last few years there has been a major pushback due to the injuries sustained by fireworks and firecrackers. An average of 50 people are injured in the country every holiday season due to fireworks, but that hasn't stopped locals from celebrating.
 
  • Colombia - Once, individuals around Colombia would launch fireworks around the nation. But a recent ban has meant that you'll only be able to see the displays in cities and towns that launch them off.
 
  • Canada - Montreal actually has its own fireworks display for the season. Once canceled in 2015, the Montreal Christmas fireworks show has returned in a big way, and is one of the best holiday displays you'll see on Christmas. You can also ice skate, zip line, and enjoy other activities before and during the fireworks presentation.
 
  • Mexico - Mexico celebrates the season for a month, marking the end of the season on January 6, when the Wise Men are said to have arrived to celebrate the birth of Christ. Mexico uses fireworks to help celebrate the holiday - firing them off on Christmas Eve after the late night "Mass of the Rooster". This celebration has ties to older cultural celebrations when torches and sparklers are used to celebrate the god Huitzilopochtli.
 
  • America - You may also be able to find fireworks in some parts of the US, in particular places like Disney or ski resorts such as Snowbird in Utah. But for the most part, US cities save the fireworks for summertime and celebrate Christmas in quieter ways.
  While South America is the main location for holiday fireworks, they're not alone. It's interesting to know that in many places, the season's traditions are more explosive and colorful than what we may be used to. But the point is, there's no wrong way to celebrate the holidays.